From Piura to the border, the last hours in Perú

From Piura to the border, the last hours in Perú

2009.02.12 (18:00)

Perú, RtWp02 | Geo: -5.1935, -80.6248

Ranking: (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

“Enjoy the two dollars. Have a good life, and take care of your prostate.” (curse and irony included)

I didn’t intend to spend a single night in Piura, because it was time to leave Peru. So I took a ticket to Loja, Ecuador. Though initially I was planning to go to Guayaquil, Loja seemed a good destination too, and it’s on the way.
I had three hours till the departure, so I got to know the market. At some point, I asked three guys for a place to buy a cold beer with my last five soles, and ended up drinking with them. They were quite nice, I wished I had known more of that kind in Perú.
After taking the bus, I slept until we got to the border. They didn’t have electricity, so it was a curious and sombre situation. At midnight, my confrontation with the Peruvian bureaucracy began.
It turned out that when I entered Perú, the stupid officer granted me a 30 day visa instead of the 90 day visa I was asking for (in the paper for entering, I put that I was going to be there around forty days). Silly of me, I didn’t check that out.
So I had been exceeding my visa for twenty-three days, and I had to pay 23 dollars. As I didn’t care about being able to return to Perú (I was sick of that country, and never willing to return), I just went to the Ecuadorian border and tried to get the stamp. Unfortunately, they did require the exit stamp from Perú to stamp the entrance to Ecuador.
I asked the Peruvian officer for any posible solution. He, Eduardo Cherres Machado, was doing his duty, but acting stupidly unflexible. Oficially I didn’t have any money. And I wasn’t the only one to blame.
Actually, my only mistake was not to check the visa when they issued it. Also, I wasn’t sure that that law of “1 dollar per day” was true or the money was going to end in the officer’s pocket (as probably happened). The money wasn’t the important thing, but the feeling of being swindled. A common feeling for a visitor in that country.
But, in the end, it seemed that there were two choices: paying, or remaining in Perú. And 23 dollars weren’t that much: I would have given my soul to get out of that country. Of course, if my soul didn’t remain there.
He got 25, because he didn’t have change. 2 more. I was pissed off. Irony and a curse.

At least it was a legal procedure.
Ansiado cruce
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Ansiado cruce
PNP y la burocracia en la oscuridad
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PNP y la burocracia en la oscuridad

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